EveryThink Ink Library

More information on the ink test procedure here

Part 1 – Playing The Iroshizuku Blues – Ajisai, Ama Iro, Asa Gao, Kon Peki, Shin Kai, Tsuyu Kusa

Part 2 – Getting Down To Earth – 
Chiku Rin, Ina Ho, Shin Ryoku, Syo Ro, Tsukushi, Yama Guri

Skipping ahead?

Part 4 – It’s Getting Dark – Fuyu Syogun, Kiri Same, Ku Jaku, Take Sumi, Tsuki Yo, Yu Yake

Pilot Iroshizuku inks seem to have their fair share of pinks and purples with some reds thrown in. As usual, most of the inks are well behaved, even though I am definitely not going to recommend Fuyu Gaki for its properties, and some of the more pastel offerings nestled in the amazingly rich Iroshizuku ink range. However, I will leave that to you, the reader, to truly decide what you like here…

 

Pilot Iroshizuku Fuyu Gaki

Pilot Iroshizuku Fuyu Gaki is apparently winter persimmon, which a tomato lover once told me was a form of devious tomato. While I do not necessarily agree with that view, I do think the ink is too far along the red path to call itself a persimmon (or even a ripe one for that matter).

Iroshizuku Fuyu Gaki is frankly the most repugnant of the Iroshizuku inks I’ve tried so far. Not only is it very prone to bleeding, it completely disappears when wet. And I do mean disappears: The resultant dilution is so significant that the ink barely leaves a proper tint on the paper on drying.

This is probably the first time I would say that I cannot recommend this ink, unless one happens to really really like the color and cannot find an exact replacement for this exact hue.

Shading – Minimal
Bleedthrough – Moderate
Feathering – Bad
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Disappears on contact with water
Drip Resistance – Disappears on contact with water
Flow – Normal

Pilot Iroshizuku Kosumosu

Pilot Iroshizuku Kosumosu is apparently Cosmos, which leaves me at something of a loss as to exactly what color the cosmos would be. As far as I know, the most accurate representation of that color would the Cosmic Latte, which is really more of a very bland brown that should really be called beige. Clearly this is not that particular hue. It is in fact a rather pastel pink that I believe would greatly please some of my more pinkly-inclined friends.

While pinks in general are not to my taste, this pink included, I must say that this particular color has me slightly puzzled. It is a pink that I would expect to have some golden sheen as is common to the red family, yet it has a slight shading and very so subtle gold sheen that I am unsure as to whether it qualifies as a sheening ink. For one, it definitely does not sheen with regular pen usage, and can only be forced out with larger ink volumes dispensed from a dip pen.

I cannot see this ink being used in a formal work setting, but it definitely is the kind of fun color that is relatively uncommon in fountain pen inks, which will result in this ink having its own niche. It is a slightly dry brew, with acceptable smudge resistance. It is not water resistant, which shouldn’t be surprising at this point.

Addendum: I was duly informed that Cosmos is not in fact a reference to the universe itself, but to Cosmos, the flower. Given its very distinctive pinkness, I am now inclined to agree that the Iroshizuku Kosumosu ink is indeed reminiscent of its muse. Shoutout to Meghan O’Connor from the Fountain Pen Network FB group for pointing this out.

Shading – Slight
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Subtle metallic gold
Smear Resistance – Moderate
Drip Resistance – None, unsurprisingly enough.
Flow – Dry/Normal

Pilot Iroshizuku Momiji

This is the Pilot Iroshizuku Momiji: Autumn Leaves (specifically Red Maple in Autumn). Interestingly, while I did manage to see winter as a kid, and have been around a couple select cities, I’ve never actually personally seen autumn. I hear it is pretty, and have seen a good number of photos on the topic. I guess it is an understandable consequence of having lived on a tropical island all my life, but I seek to change that (and will accept aid to help that along =p). That said, this particular species of purplish near-blood red is something I may have seen in pictures of autumn leaves, so I guess the inspiration holds true here.

As is common to the family of reds and purples, this ink actually has a pronounced metallic gold sheen. Arguably slightly green, but I would place it in the family of gold. Interestingly, this sheen can subtly rim the writing itself, which leads to a very subtle effect that can catch the eye in fleeting moments and invite the reader to examine the paper more closely. Well, perhaps a reader who cares about this sort of thing anyway.

I really like this ink, and think it to be a fairly reliable red that can lend itself to formal use. That is, if one can make do with moderate smear resistance and no soak resistance. I think the sheen makes up for that particular shortcoming, and I would expect that the ink still flows well enough to satisfy most users.

Shading – Slight
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Pronounced metallic gold
Smear Resistance – Moderate
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Dry/Normal

Pilot Iroshizuku Tsusuji

Behold the regal Pilot Iroshizuku Azalea. I mean Pilot Iroshizuku Tsutsuji. Pilot seems to have a good number of reds and purples in the Iroshizuku line, which leads me to believe that the colors of nature in Japan may involve a good number of these hues. Oddly, while this particular hue is in fact a good distance from Royal Purple, I have somehow come to associate it with the color, probably due to the way that metallic greenish golden sheen stands out on this rather fine ink.

The Iroshizuku Tsutsuji ink is in fact a hybrid of purple and pink, which actually looks rather nice when laid on thick. It is nearly a magenta, but lacks the shocking brightness that I have come to associate with it. That said, this ink comes with a brilliant metallic gold sheen with distinct flashes of green to it, making it quite eye catching even on normal writing. I would compare this sheen to the one present in Pilot Iroshizuku Momiji.

As a purple it probably is less acceptable in serious-minded workplaces, but I expect that fans would find ways to sneak this stuff into their workflow anyway. It must be noted that whatever work one does in Iroshizuku Tsutsuji must not touch water under any circumstances. I will not be held responsible for what happens, as you can probably see from the scan above.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Pronounced metallic greenish gold
Smear Resistance – None
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Dry/Normal

Pilot Iroshizuku Yama Budo

Some may call this Crimson Glory Vine. Others call it mountain grapes. To me, Pilot Iroshizuku Yama Budo will be precisely that: Yama Budo. And while I am generally not mad about purples, I have a very personal soft spot for this particular ink. But first, a story about grapes and grape aromas. I was initially led to believe that grape flavor was some variety of inexplicably chemical-like aroma which spawned out of nothingness. I later found out that the Concord type grapes, of which Japanese Kyoho grapes are a member, smelled remarkably like artificial grape smell (or vice versa). This surprised me, because the grapes I’ve had thus far did not in fact smell anything like…grapes.

Back to Iroshizuku Yama Budo. It is an ink that is actually a deep grape purple which I would actually term a variety of royal purple. More importantly, it seems prone to developing a metallic gold rim to it, which reminds me of the rich purple with gold trim I have come to associate with Roman Togas of Tyrian Purple. In fact it wound up as one of the first inks I acquired in my ink exploration journey, and I am happy that it is now possible to include it in the full Iroshizuku set.

Iroshizuku Yama Budo is a lovely ink, and be damned if the office does not allow such a beautiful color in business correspondence. That said, the ink has a slight resistance to a smudge and while barely water resistant it actually maintains a core of legibility on a soak! Surprising. Upon wetting, the color the ink lets off actually makes me want to lick it, however bad an idea that may well be.

Shading – Minimal
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Metallic gold
Smear Resistance – Slight
Drip Resistance – Slight
Flow – Dry/Normal

Pilot Iroshizuku Murasaki Shikibu

This is the Pilot Iroshizuku Murasaki Shikibu ink. Some may translate it to the Japanese Beautyberry, but my first exposure to the name lies with the poet/author by the same name, also creator of the Tale of Genji. I am ashamed to say I have never actually read the copy in its native language.

That told, the ink itself is actually a fairly delicate purple, more determinedly purple than images of Japanese Beautyberry I have seen online: Those lean more towards magenta than an actual purple. I do not really know what to make of the ink, because it is a generally light example of an Iroshizuku ink, yet tries to be purple. Would that make this a pastel purple, perhaps?

I cannot say that I recommend this ink, considering all those other wonderful Iroshizuku offerings. This one is somewhat anaemic, and I had high hopes of the output considering its name, but alas. Still, this ink seems fairly smudge friendly, even though it will not survive a thorough wetting.

Shading – Slight
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Subtle purple gloss
Smear Resistance – Moderate
Drip Resistance – Very slight
Flow – Dry/Normal

Having gone through the Pilot Iroshizuku pinks, purples and touches of red, I hope you had a good time and perhaps the opportunity to make a choice of the kind of ink you want from this set. To view more, feel free to click on the links below:

[Ink test Library] Click here for all previous ink tests

Missed the previous Pilot Iroshizuku ink features? View them here:

Part 1 – Playing The Iroshizuku Blues – Ajisai, Ama Iro, Asa Gao, Kon Peki, Shin Kai, Tsuyu Kusa

Part 2 – Getting Down To Earth – 
Chiku Rin, Ina Ho, Shin Ryoku, Syo Ro, Tsukushi, Yama Guri

Skipping ahead?

Part 4 – It’s Getting Dark – Fuyu Syogun, Kiri Same, Ku Jaku, Take Sumi, Tsuki Yo, Yu Yake

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