EveryThink Ink Library

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Pelikan’s Edelstein inks are a premium line that are named after gemstones (Edelstein is German for gemstone) and come bottled in heavy glassware with pricetags to match the appellation. Edelstein inks incorporate “a special ingredient that ensures extra smooth writing and care for the fountain pen” according to Pelikan.

I do have something of a weakness for beautiful bottles, and I must admit that Edelstein bottles are easily one of my favorites. The squat cuboids with rounded edges with extra thick glass on the base all work together to create a sculpture that I am reasonably certain to not fall over at the worst possible moment were it not given undue encouragement.

The inks are what I have come to expect of a superior lineage, with them being possessed of sufficient color depth and indeed being rather smooth on the nib. I cannot attest to their cleaning and maintenance properties, however. These inks do generally have some of the dryness that one may be used to from using Pelikan’s 4001 range, and they are comparably well behaved as well.

Pelikan Edelstein Sapphire

Sapphires are quite startling gems, with a characteristic deep blueness with a remarkable crystalline clarity. Pelikan Edelstein Sapphire inherits something of that beauty, with its shading leading to a darkness rimming the writing and lending this rather pure (if leaning on purplish) blue a character which really adds to its illusion of clarity and frankly I think this makes for a really beautiful blue. It is also fairly dry, so wet pen users the world over rejoice. This ink will smudge somewhat, so take care. And it definitely does not withstand a soaking, so don’t.

Shading – High
Bleedthrough – Very slight
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Limited
Drip Resistance – Very limited
Flow – Dry

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby

Pelikan Edelstein Ruby is a rather more pinkish interpretation of what would otherwise be mistaken for Garnet. In a form true to many Pelikan inks, this particular offering is actually rather dry, which would probably be pleasing to fans of fine lines and who have exceedingly wet pens. It also has some rather nice shading going. This ink actually has a surprising resilience towards a moist swabbing, and it barely budges on a smudge. Hmm! It can also  just barely survive a soaking, though sadly this also means that despite its stubbornness in the face of the swab does not carry over to a more determined effort at removal by water.

Shading – Notable
Bleedthrough – Limited
Feathering – None
Sheen – No, but some ink separation that trends golden brown where it’s lighter.
Smear Resistance – Very high
Drip Resistance – Limited
Flow – Dry

Pelikan Edelstein Onyx

Black is a staple color in the ink stable, and depending on the onyx referenced I would say that Pelikan Edelstein Onyx makes the mark. As a black it is quite sound indeed and is in fact quite devoid of shading. That much is good in a black.  Smudging wise it is actually quite resilient, though I definitely cannot guarantee its legibility upon a dedicated dunking.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Very high
Drip Resistance – Limited
Flow – Normal

Pelikan Edelstein Mandarin

Ordinarily I’d have some misgivings about inks in the orange range because for some reason my encounters with them have tended towards watching with some amusement and disgust as the inks grew roots into my paper. Edelstein Mandarin is not one of those inks. In fact it is well behaved and somewhat on the wet side for a Pelikan. It reminds me of rather nicely ripened Mandarins, and if one presented me with a similarly colored orange I would certainly think to eat it. As can be seen from the swab, it is actually quite resistant to a casual smudge even though it definitely would not survive a soaking. Interesting.

Shading – Quite a bit
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – High
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Wet/Normal

Pelikan Edelstein Jade

Jade is another gemstone that comes in various shades of green and some varieties can indeed be confused with Aventurine. This example of Edelstein Jade would be what I call Turquoise, no more and no less. It has gone enough down the sky blue route by way of green that it can only qualify as a sky blue-green. Jade has a nice shading that goes from light turquoise into a dark green that borders on moss. Its somewhat somber note actually does it credit, and it may have been a passable ink for me were it not utterly afraid of water. That said, those looking for a sober looking turquoise ink need look no further. It still is a rather nice offering.

Shading – Definitely notable
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Moderate
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Normal

Pelikan Edelstein Garnet Red

Being Pelikan’s Edelstein Ink of the Year 2014, Garnet Red is a rather appealing shade of red with just enough brown in it to make it a rather satisfyingly bloody red with some shading.  It has a tendency to develop an ever so slight darkening towards the edges of one’s writing, making the words stand out with minimal effort. On the whole I do find myself developing a personal bias towards this, and it would have wound up on my daily rotation were it not for my penchant for waterproofing in my inks. As can be seen in the test, it will most definitely not withstand a soaking.

Shading – Very limited
Bleedthrough – Limited
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance –None
Drip Resistance – Very limited
Flow – Dry/Normal

Pelikan Edelstein Tanzanite

Tanzanite is a gemstone that shows up only in Tanzania (interestingly enough) and is reputed for its luminous blue and purple hue. Looking at the Edelstein Tanzanite, I cannot help but think it too far along the grey path and simply lacks the luminous blue-purple that I have come to associate with Tanzanite. On the merit of its own color, however, the ink does serve as a somber grey-blue for one who may want a blue-black that is a little less conventional. It will most definitely smudge and is a little on the dry side, but it is likely to remain legible despite touching it with a moist fingertip.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – Very slight
Feathering –None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Limited
Drip Resistance – Very limited
Flow – Dry

Pelikan Edelstein Aventurine

Edelstein Aventurine is a deep green that is reminiscent of Faber-Castell’s Moss Green, albeit being ever so slightly farther from the blue end of the spectrum. I would not compare this to actual Aventurine, which comes in a great variety of colors, so it would be hard to pinpoint the exact sort of Aventurine this ink is intended to match. As a Pelikan ink, however, Aventurine is actually rather wet and this lends itself to rather smooth writing. It is prone to bleed, however. Unfortunately like most inks in this spectrum it is also not at all resistant to a soak but is interestingly receptive to a smear. Curious.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – Moderate
Feathering – Moderate
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – High
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Wet

Pelikan Edelstein Turmaline

Edelstein Turmaline is the Ink of the Year 2012 . It seems to be intended to take after the Rubelite variety of Tourmaline, with its distictive red with a strong pink heritage. It is of normal wetness, which makes it wetter than is common to the Pelikan 4001 range. As with Edelstein offerings, the ink is sufficiently saturated as to allow the ink to remain a rich pinkish red without leaning too far into a more anaemic pink territory. The ink is absolutely not water resistant, so it is likely easy on pens but unforgiving for when one spills one’s drink on it.

Shading – Some
Bleedthrough –  None
Feathering – None whatsoever
Sheen – Very very subtle gold
Smear Resistance – Limited
Drip Resistance – None
Flow – Dry/Normal

 

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