EveryThink Ink Library

More information on the ink test procedure here

Part 1 – Iron Gall Blues Roundup

For those who are interested in acquiring these inks, you may contact Konrad at his KWZ Ink website here.

This post is a continuation of the feature of the Iron Gall inks formulated by Konrad of KWZ Ink. For those who missed Part 1 – Blues Roundup, have a gander here. For everyone else, the feature continues.

This second part of the feature delves into the color spectrum that iron gall inks traditionally do not wander into: Greens towards amber/gold. For most IG offerings out there, they are typically limited to the blue-black range and the odd purple (Rohrer & Klingner Scabiosa). KWZ just so happens to have a unique offering in the realm of IG inks.

On the whole, the Green to Gold spectrum of IG inks are less water resistant than the Blue spectrum offerings. They exhibit noticeable color bleed on wetting, but maintain legibility through a soaking. I would classify them all as generally water resistant. For those who are generally careful with their work, this should not be an issue. And to me, they do perform well enough to make it worth one’s while to use them for the color variety alone.

Some have expressed concern about iron gall inks and fountain pens. Traditional iron galls are indeed quite corrosive and can damage pens left inked up for extended periods and are known to burn through paper over centuries. However, KWZ’s offering is a more modern formulation that is less harsh on pens (and hopefully on paper; check with me a few centuries later) due to it not having the acid content of traditional formulations.

To put things in perspective on concerns of clogging, I have loaded Rohrer & Klingner’s Salix and Scabiosa in Pilot Petit pens for months with no noticeable corrosion on the nibs (this is bad pen hygiene and I do not recommend you do it) nor any noticeable brittleness of the feed. From personal experience, pens that are prone to drying out from laying idle are very prone to clogging. And that is why I am strongly leaning towards fountain pens that are generally dry proof when properly capped.

KWZ IG Turquoise

IG Turquoise really belongs more along the blue spectrum than green, but is sufficiently far removed from the traditional IG colors that I reckoned it fit better with the green team. Like the blues, however, turquoise is rather more water resistant than what you would see in the following test samples. It maintains legibility with a bright blue-leaning turquoise bleed, though I expect it would be sufficient to annoy those who insist on having utterly smudge-free work. It is most similar to Rohrer & Klingner’s Verdigris upon oxidation.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Glossiness when laid on thick
Smear Resistance – Pronounced turquoise smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Dry/Normal

KWZ IG Green #1

IG Green #1 is a dark grey green (or verdigris) that has enough blue in it to almost (but not quite) qualify as a turquoise. As noted previously, this ink exhibits noticeable bleed on wetting and is generally water resistant. To be sure, however, I definitely prefer this to the Rohrer & Klingner’s interpretation of Verdigris (and that one isn’t even iron gall).

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Glossiness when laid on thick
Smear Resistance – Pronounced blue-green smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Dry/Normal

KWZ IG Green #2

IG Green #2 leans more towards the yellow spectrum and does not exhibit as much blue as #1. This is especially noticeable in the color bleed when wet. Otherwise, the Green #2 is actually very similar to #1, even with similar wetness.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Glossiness when laid on thick
Smear Resistance – Pronounced blue-yellow-green smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Dry/Normal

KWZ IG Green #3

IG Green #3 leans further into yellow, taking on a more olive green appearance. At this point it ceases to bleed blue, and is almost entirely olive on a swab test. It is a hair wetter than the previous two offerings.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Glossiness when laid on thick
Smear Resistance – Pronounced olive smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Normal

KWZ IG Green #4

IG Ink #4 is a very similar olive green to #3, and is a hair drier. After oxidation, it is arguable than #3 and #4 are virtually indistinguishable. However, it must be noted that #4 is definitely lighter than #3 and has a less dense bleed on wetting.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – Glossiness when laid on thick
Smear Resistance – Pronounced olive smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Dry/Normal

 

KWZ IG Green Gold

IG Green Gold is indeed a green leaning towards gold, just yellow enough to move beyond the range of olive yet maintaining a clear heritage. It maintains a clear legibility upon wetting, but still develops a golden green halo. This ink is also noticeably on the wet side for an IG ink. I would regard this as quite similar to Rohrer & Klingner’s Alt-Goldgrun (Gold Green) though R&K’s offering is decidedly lighter, wetter and has more shading than this example.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Pronounced gold-green smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Normal/Wet

KWZ IG Gold

IG Gold is where we enter the fun zone of orange/red spectrum inks. Gold is a fascinating ink, because of the way it oxidizes. It starts off as a relatively clear amber solution which rapidly darkens within 2 hours to the color you see in the sample here. I am strongly inclined to do a time lapse of this oxidation process, since it is impossible to capture it in a scan without smudging the work. Upon oxidation, the ink actually takes on the appearance of tarnished brass. This ink is notable for being quite legible despite the bleed, though it remains firmly on the water resistant side.

Shading – None
Bleedthrough – None
Feathering – None
Sheen – None
Smear Resistance – Pronounced tarnished brass smearing
Drip Resistance – Generally water resistant, pronounced color bleed
Flow – Dry/Normal

Hopefully you have enjoyed going over part 2 of the KWZ Iron Gall ink test. If you wish to review Part 1, feel free to click the link below. Stay tuned for the next and final part of the KWZ IG ink feature!

For those who are interested in acquiring these inks, you may contact Konrad at his KWZ Ink website here.

Part 1 – Iron Gall Blues Roundup

[Ink Test Library] Click here for all previous ink tests

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